Quick Answer: What holidays do they celebrate in Latvia?

What are the main holidays in Latvia?

Public holidays in Latvia

New Year’s Day 1 January
Declaration of Independence of the Republic of Latvia 4 May
Midsummer Day 23 June
St. John’s Day 24 June
Proclamation of the Republic of Latvia 18 November

What do Latvians celebrate?

Latvia’s most important national holiday is arguably not Christmas but the summer solstice celebrations of Ligo (pronounced “leegwa”) – a pagan tradition when Latvians celebrate the shortest night by staying up to greet the rising sun.

Do they celebrate Christmas in Latvia?

Children in Latvia believe that Santa Claus (also known as Ziemassvētku vecītis – Christmas old man) brings their presents. The present are usually put under the Christmas tree. The presents are opened on during the Evening of Christmas Eve or on Christmas Day.

Who is the most famous Latvian?

Famous people from Latvia

  • Ernests Gulbis. Tennis Player. Ernests Gulbis is a Latvian professional tennis player. …
  • Mark Rothko. Painting Artist. …
  • Mikhail Baryshnikov. Ballerina. …
  • Sergei Eisenstein. Film costumer designer. …
  • Vitas. Alternative rock Artist. …
  • Gidon Kremer. Violinist. …
  • Heinz Erhardt. Film Actor. …
  • Mikhail Tal. Chess Player.

What is the average temperature in Latvia?

The average annual air temperature in Latvia is +5.9°C. The year’s warmest month is July, its average temperature is +17.0°C and average maximum temperature +21.5°C. The coldest months are January and February, when the average temperatures are -4.6 and -4.7°C, and average minimums -7.5 and -7.9°C.

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How wealthy is Latvia?

Latvia is a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO) since 1999, a member of the European Union since 2004, a member of the Eurozone since 2014 and a member of the OECD since 2016.

Economy of Latvia.

Statistics
GDP $38 billion (nominal, 2021 est.) $63 billion (PPP, 2021 est.)
GDP rank 95th (nominal, 2019) 102nd (PPP, 2019)
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