Did Germany occupy Finland in ww2?

German troops arrived in Finland and took up positions, mostly in Lapland, from where they would invade the Soviet Union. … On 25 June the Soviet Union launched an air raid against Finnish cities, after which Finland declared war and also allowed German troops stationed in Finland to begin offensive warfare.

Was Finland occupied by Germany in ww2?

In fact, Finland allied itself with Nazi Germany during the second world war not to prevent Soviet conquest but to win back territories lost to the USSR as a result of the winter war of 1939-40. The peace treaty that ended the war in March 1940 left Finnish independence intact.

Why didn’t Germany invade Sweden?

Hitler did not invade Sweden because he did not want to waste valuable troops in Scandinavia when he had other concerns. The Swedes proved their neutrality by not letting Germany use Swedish airspace: when the Germans flew over Sweden to attack Norway, the Swedes fired back with anti-aircraft guns.

Why did Russia invade Finland in ww2?

Finland believed the Soviet Union wanted to expand into its territory and the Soviet Union feared Finland would allow itself to be used as a base from which enemies could attack. … A faked border incident gave the Soviet Union the excuse to invade on 30 November 1939.

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Why did Switzerland not join ww2?

During World War I and World War II, Switzerland maintained armed neutrality, and was not invaded by its neighbors, in part because of its topography, much of which is mountainous.

Why didn’t Germany invade Ireland?

Both Germany and Great Britain had plans to invade Ireland. Germany couldn’t launch such an attack as they lacked the naval power to do it, as they knew that the Royal Navy would intervene.

How did Switzerland stay neutral in both world wars?

To keep the country safe from the Allies and Axis powers, the Swiss used a strategy called “armed neutrality,” requiring maintaining a sizable army to isolate itself within the country’s frontiers and allowing it to defend against foreign incursion.

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